STEVE MARTINO

STEVE MARTINO

STEVE MARTINO

STEVE MARTINO

STEVE MARTINO

STEVE MARTINO

PIKIONIS

Dimitris Pikionis or Demetrios Pikionis (Piraeus 1887 –Athens 1968) was a major Greek architect of the 20th century and had a considerable influence in Contemporary Greek Architecture. He was a founding member of the Association of Greek Art Critics, AICA-Hellas, International Association of Art Critics. He studied civil engineering at the National Technical University of Athens and then continued his studies to Paris and Munich, in sculpture and drawing. Pikionis was back then introduced to the work of Paul Cezanne and became friends with Giorgio de Chirico. Later he returned to Greece and architecture, and in 1925 undertook a lecturer position at the decoration department at the National Technical University of Athens. He has been often described as a critical regionalist and sometimes as a European modernist. Pikionis hasn’t produced many works and the leitmotif in his work has been, according to architecture historians, the epiphany, the contrast between bleached marble and sodden soil.

PIKIONIS

PIKIONIS

PIKIONIS

PIKIONIS

PETER WALKER

For more info visit:

http://www.pwpla.com

PETER WALKER

PETER WALKER

PETER WALKER

MARTHA SCHWARZ

For more info visit:

http://www.marthaschwartz.com

MARTHA SCHWARZ

MARTHA SCHWARZ

MARTHA SCHWARZ

MARTHA SCHWARZ

KIM WILKIE

For more info visit:

http://www.kimwilkie.com

KIM WILKIE

KIM WILKIE

KIM WILKIE

KIM WILKIE

KIM WILKIE

KEN SMITH

Ken Smith (born 1953) grew up in Iowa, and attended Iowa State University, where he graduated with a Bachelor’s of Landscape Architecture in 1976. After graduation, he apprenticed with sculptor Paul Shao, and worked for the Iowa Conservation Commission in Parks and Recreation Planning. He attended the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and received his Master’s in Landscape Architecture in 1986.

After working in the office of Peter Walker and Martha Schwartz, he opened his own office in New York City in 1992.

Ken Smith is active as an educator, teaching as an adjunct professor at the City College of New York from 1992 to 1996, and as a visiting design critic at the Harvard Graduate School of Design from 1997 to the present.

Smith is a board member of the Architectural League of New York and is active in advocating preservation of modern works of landscape architecture.

Smith was a member of the THINK team in the World Trade Center competition in 2002. Smith was recently awarded a major commission for a 1,300-acre (530 ha) urban park on the decommissioned El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, California.

KEN SMITH

KEN SMITH

KEN SMITH

KEN SMITH

KATHRIN GUSTAFSON

For more info visit:

www.katherinegustafson.com

KATHRIN GUSTAFSON

KATHRIN GUSTAFSON

JENS JENSEN

For more info visit:

http://www.jensjensen.org

 JENS JENSEN

JENS JENSEN

JENS JENSEN

JENS JENSEN

JENS JENSEN

HIDEO SASAKI

(1919–2000)

American landscape-architect of Japanese extraction. With Peter Walker he founded (1952) Sasaki, Walker Associates in San Francisco, CA, the first of a series of partnerships that eventually established several offices in the USA and Canada. Among the firm’s works of landscape design may be cited the Golden Gateway Center, San Francisco, Foothill College, Los Altos, Weyerhaeuser Headquarters, Tacoma, the roof-gardens, etc., Bona-ventura Hotel, Montréal, Canada, Greenacre Park NYC, Constitution Plaza, Hartford ecc.

HIDEO SASAKI

HIDEO SASAKI

HIDEO SASAKI

EDWARD DURELL

Edward Durell Stone, Jr., (1932-2009), was an American landscape architect.

The son of the accomplished architect, Edward Durell Stone, Edward Stone, Jr. graduated from Phillips Academy, then went on to Yale, where he received a degree in Architectural Design. Later he served three years as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force.This allowed him to see the world and the “natural beauty of the land”, which played a role in his decision to pursue landscape architecture. He received his Masters degree of Landscape Architecture from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.Stone began his career in 1959.Initially, he practiced under another Fort Lauderdale architect, but soon became self-employed and founded EDSA. The firm began to prosper while collaborating on projects with Stone’s father.

Stone’s career continued after getting its boost in 1960 when he created his firm, Edward Durell Stone, Jr. and Associates or EDSA. In 1991, it was unanimous opinion among interviewed principals of large and small firms that Stone’s firm was among the top five. Stone’s work and career greatly impacted tourism and community-living in the United States, especially in Florida, as well as in the Caribbean and Europe.In Landscape Architecture Magazine, Jane Brown Gillette reports that Stone realized what he wanted to do at age seventeen while attending a dinner dance at the Everglades Club in Palm Beach, Florida. Here the scenery within the building’s courtyard impacted him in such a way that would eventually have an effect on many landscapes throughout Florida and the Caribbean and on the profession of landscape architecture through his work.

Edward D. Stone, Jr. was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and he received the 1994 ASLA Medal. The Medal “is the highest honor the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) may bestow upon a landscape architect whose lifetime achievements and contributions to the profession have had a unique and lasting impact on the welfare of the public and the environment.” Stone served three consecutive four-year terms on the Commission of Fine Arts, appointed by Presidents Nixon, Ford, and Carter, and he served as a consultant to the Committee for a More Beautiful Capitol in Washington, D.C., and to the Governor’s Conference on Environmental Quality in the State of Florida.

At EDSA, Mr. Stone continued to play a role in directing the charettes that begin most projects, and he participated in design reviews. Gillette says EDSA specializes in recreation-based communities and resorts, both national and international. The firm also does notable work in urban and campus design, in places of entertainment and attraction, and in environment and ecotourism. Some of EDSA’s main projects include Disney World’s West Side, Euro Disneyland, Riverwalk in Fort Lauderdale, the Fort Lauderdale Beach Revitalization, El Conquistador Resort and Country Club, and Hyatt Regency Aruba Resort and Casino. Stone and his firm have become recognized for their expertise in planning and design for resort and community development.The projects in Fort Lauderdale, voted best city of its size in 1994, have helped make the city a tourist destination. In designing these places, Stone says they try to create “an idealized place, what the environment would be if everything were right in the world.”

EDWARD DURELL

EDWARD DURELL

EDWARD DURELL

DAN KILEY

Born – Died : 1912 – 2004

Dan Kiley was born in Boston Mass in 1912. From the age of 20 to 26 he worked in the office of Warren Manning. Like Fletcher Steele, who had worked for Manning 30 years before, he then enrolled in Harvard’s landscape architecture programme. He made friends with his classmates James Rose and Garret Eckbo and, like Steele, left before graduating. Kiley took a job, as Associate Town Planning Architect, with the United States Housing Authority where he had the good fortune to make friends with Louis Kahn and Eero Saarinen. Kiley left the Authority in 1940 and began to work on residential projects, including a garden for the Edmund Bacon (later the author of Design of cities). From 1942-45 Kiley served with the Army Corps of Engineers, including a spell as architect for the Nuremberg Trials Courtroom, which gave him an opportunity to visit European Gardens. The geometrical purity of Le N�tre impressed him, and laid the basis for his own future classicism. In 1955 he worked with Saarinen on the Miller garden. Inspired by Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, and the De Stijl movement, it had a grid plan and full integration of indoor with outdoor space. As in Palladian villas, geometrical shapes were valued for their Neoplatonic purity. Palladio projected the geometry of the Villa Rotunda to form the entrance steps, but no further. Kiley and Saarinen projected the grid of the building to structure the outdoor space around the building in a Mondrian-type asymmetrical pattern. There was also a picturesque transition from Garden to Meadow to Wood. The Miller garden was widely acclaimed and became a key American example of the Abstract style. It is at once splendidly modern and rooted in tradition. Like Palladio and Schoenmaekers, Kiley believes the perfect geometrical forms have a cosmic awareness. He aimed to ‘express this connectedness with the universe’ in his design approach. Kiley’s subsequent projects, evidencing a beautifully proportioned grid-based classicism, include the United States Air Force Academy, the Oakland Museum, Independence Mall in Philadelphia, the Dallas Museum of Art, and Fountain Place in Texas. In her book on The Modern Garden (2000) Jane Brown rightly describes Kiley as ‘the supreme master of the modern garden’.

DAN KILEY

DAN KILEY

DAN KILEY

DAN KILEY

BURLE MARX

Roberto Burle Marx (August 4, 1909, São Paulo – June 4, 1994, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian landscape designer (besides being a painter, ecologist and naturalist) whose designs of parks and gardens made him world famous. He is accredited with having introduced modernist landscape architecture to Brazil. He was known as a modern nature artist and a public urban space designer.

Robert Burle Marx father was an emigrant from the city Trier in Germany. His mother was Brazilian from the “upper class”.

Burle Marx’s first landscaping inspirations came while studying painting in Germany, where he often visited the Dahlem Botanical Gardens and first learned about Brazil’s native flora. Upon returning to Brazil in 1930, he began collecting plants in and around his home. In 1932, Burle Marx designed his first landscape for a private residence by the architects Lucio Costa and Gregori Warchavchik.

In 1949 he acquired the 365,000m² estate Barra de Guaratiba (just outside of Rio de Janeiro) to house his growing collection of plants. This property was donated to the Brazilian government in 1985 and became a national monument. Now called Sítio Roberto Burle Marx, under the direction of IPHAN-Instituto do Patrimônio Histórico e Artístico Nacional / Ministério da Cultura, it houses over 3,500 species of plants. The house was rebuilt in a valley opening on the site of a garden house belonging to the original plantation estate.

Roberto Burle Marx founded a landscape studio in 1955 and in the same year he founded a landscape company, called Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda.

Much of his work has a sense of timelessnes and perfection. His creations were each unique expressions of thought. His aesthetics were often nature based, for example, never mixing flower colours, utilisation of big groups of the same specimen, using native plants and making a rocky field into relaxing garden. He was very interested in each plant’s character and what effect that has on the whole garden.

He spent a lot of time in the Brazilian forests where he was able to study and explore. This enabled him to add significantly to the botantical sciences, by discover new rocks plants for example. At least 30 plants bear his name.

burle marx

burle marx

burle marx

burle marx

ANDREA COCHRAN

Για πληροφορίες σχετικές με το έργο της:

www.acochran.com

asla '05 awards

ANDREA COCHRAN

ANDREA COCHRAN

ANDREA COCHRAN